eastern mud salamander (Pseudotriton montanus)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHARACTERISTICS: This is a stocky, reddish salamander with a

short tail and brown eyes. It grows to lengths of 3-6 1/2 in. (7.5-16.5

cm.). It has black spots on the back that are round and distinct. The

color of the back is distinct from that of the reddish sides. Young sal-

amanders are brighter, with distinctly separated spots and unmarked

bellies. Older salamaders are red-brown to chocolate colored, with

more, larger spots, and bellies spotted with black or brown. Courtship

occurs in the early fall, spawning in December, and hatching in Feb-

ruary. The clutch size is 66-192 and this species lays eggs every other

year. The males mature in 3 years and the females in 4 years. It has

been suggested that this salamander mimics the red eft stage of east-

ern newts.

 

DISTRIBUTION: This salamander inhabits muddy springs and mucky
areas along streams, swamps, and bogs. The eastern mud salamander
lives in the Piedmont and parts of the Coastal Plain, while the midland
mud salamander is found west of the New River. In December and
January they are found buried deep in mud at the bottom of a pool.

 

FOODS: The aquatic larvae feed on small aquatic invertebrates. Not
much is known about the adults' food habits, but it is thought that they
eat small invertebrates, such as beetles, spiders, and mites.

 

 

Back to Invntory of Amphibian Families and Species

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