little wood satyr (Megisto cymela)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONFIRMATION STATUS: Confirmed.


FAMILY: Brush-footed Butterflies (Nymphalidae)
SUBFAMILY: Satyrs and Wood-Nymphs (Satyrinae)


IDENTIFICATION: Light brown. Forewing has 2 yellow-rimmed black
eyespots both above and below. Hindwing has 2 eyespots on upper side;
but may have smaller spots below.


LIFE HISTORY: In the early morning and late afternoon, Little Wood
Satyrs bask with their wings open while perched on tree leaves or on
leaf litter. Adults have a slow bouncing flight and will rise as far as the
tops of tall trees. Males patrol in the shade to find females. Eggs are laid
singly on grass blades. Fourth-stage caterpillars hibernate.


FLIGHT: One brood from June-July in the north; two to three broods
from March-September in the south.


WING SPAN: 1 1/2 - 1 7/8 inches (3.8 - 4.8 cm).


CATERPILLAR HOSTS: Orchard grass (Dactylis glomerata) and centipede
grass (Eremochloa ophiuroides).


ADULT FOOD: Sap, aphid honeydew, and rarely flower nectar.


HABITAT: Grassy woods and openings, old fields; especially in limey or
basic soils.


RANGE: Eastern Nebraska and northeastern Colorado south to eastern
Texas; east through all of the eastern United States except northern
New England, southern peninsular Florida, and coastal Louisiana.


CONSERVATION: Not usually required.


NATURESERVE GLOBAL STATUS: G5 - Demonstrably secure globally,
though it may be quite rare in parts of its range, especially at the
periphery.


MANAGEMENT NEEDS: None reported.


SKY MEADOWS OCCURRENCE:

 

Note: Due to seasonal conditions in this region, occurrence may vary from

year to year. The designation of occurrence may range over two or more

categories and may vary even during a single season.

 

Key to Checklist

A   Abundant: Easy to see very large numbers of individuals in appropriate habitat
      at proper time of year.
C   Common: Usually each to see good numbers of individuals in appropriate habitat
      at proper time of year.
U   Uncommon: Sometimes found in appropriate habitat and proper time of year,
      usually in low numbers.
O   Occasional: Found in appropriate habitat perhaps only a few times a year, usually
      in low numbers.
R   Rare: Small chance of being found, even in appropriate habitat at proper time of
      year. There are few individuals and may not be present every year.
X   Extirpated: Formerly present, no longer occurs in Sky Meadows Park.

 

      January

      February

      March

      April
      May

      June

      July

      August

      September

      October

      November

      December

 

 

Back to Inventory of Butterfly Families and Species

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