True Brushfoots (Subfamily Nymphalinae)

 

SUBFAMILY DESCRIPTION: Brushfoots are the most prevalent members
of the Family Nymphalinae. Distributed worldwide, this is a diverse
group that contains several tribes, each with somewhat different
structural and biological features. Adults of North American species are
predominantly orange, brown, and black. Wing shape and mating
systems are variable. Most checkerspots and crescentspots patrol for
mates, while the remainder of groups exhibit either perching or
perching and patrolling. Migration varies widely; some strong migrants
are found in the lady butterflies, tortoiseshells, and anglewings, while
other species are local in occurrence. Most species limit their host plants
to a few species, but the painted lady has one of the widest host palettes
of all butterflies. Eggs are laid singly or clustered in groups, and
caterpillars be found feeding alone or communally. Brushfoots
overwinter as young caterpillars or hibernating adults.

 

 

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