Mole Salamanders (Family Ambystomaditae)

 

Mole salamanders (Genus Ambystoma) are a group of salamanders
endemic to North America, the only genus in Family Ambystomatidae.
The group has become famous due to the presence of the Axolotl
(Ambystoma mexicanum), widely used in research, and the tiger
salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum, Ambystoma mavortium) which
is the official amphibian of many states, and often sold as a pet.

 

Terrestrial mole salamanders are identified by having wide, protrud-

ing eyes, prominent costal grooves, thick arms, and rounded tails.

Most have vivid patterning on dark backgrounds, with marks rang-

ing from deep blue spots to large yellow bars depending on the spe-

cies. Terrestrial adults spend most of their life underground in bur-

rows either of their own making or abandoned by other animals.

Some Northern species may hibernate in these burrows throughout

the winter. They live alone and feed on any available invertebrate.

Adults spend little time in the water, only returning to the ponds of

their birth to breed.

 

 

Back to Invntory of Amphibian Families and Species

Home Page

Park Activities

   Calendar of Events
  
Volunteer Programs

   Park Regulations

Sky Meadows Park
  
Location
   Geography
   Habitats
   Trails
   Visiting Park

   Virtual Tours

Crooked Run Valley

   Historic District

   Architecture Sites

   Mt. Bleak

   Historical Events

   Park History

   Agriculture

Special Projects

   Blue Bird

   Biodiversity Survey

   BioBlitz 

 

Home Page

Nature Guide

   Purpose

   Databases

   Copyright

Plants

   Trees

   Shrubs

   Vines

   Forbs/Herbs

   Ferns

   Grasses

Animals

   Mammals

   Birds

   Reptiles

   Amphibians

   Fish

   Butterflies

   Bees

Fungi

   Mushrooms

   Lichens